Pre-Engineering students extract DNA from a strawberry

December 5, 2017 No comments exist

Pre-Engineering students extract DNA from a strawberry

Caddo Kiowa Technology Center Pre-Engineering students extract DNA to test foods for the presence or absence of Genetically Modified Organisms. The first step in this process is to learn about DNA in general and to extract it from a food.

“Strawberries contain a lot of DNA, relatively speaking, so they are the food of choice for extracting DNA for beginners,” explains Instructor Marcia Harmon.

After the students extracted the DNA, they wanted to look at the cellular debris and strands of DNA under a microscope, taking the lesson a step further than what was required of them.

Next, the students will test corn that is genetically modified and oats that aren’t in addition to other foods that the students choose to test for the presence of genetic modification.

This lesson is part of the PLTW Pre-Engineering Environmental Sustainability course.

“Lots of learning and lots of fun,” concluded Harmon.

For almost half a century, CKTC has provided career training, business and industry services and leadership programs to a rural district in southwest Oklahoma. Opportunities at CKTC range from business and health to science and transportation trades. Additionally, CKTC offers customized workplace training and short-term training. More information about CKTC is available online at www.mycktc.com or by calling 405.643.5511. CKTC is a proud member of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, which provides leadership and resources and assures standards of excellence for a comprehensive statewide system of career and technology education. The system offers programs and services in 29 technology center districts.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

 

Pre-Engineering students extract DNA from a strawberry
Pre-Engineering Students Charnel Lindsey, Carnegie; Peyton Sage, Binger; and Gabe Watkins, Binger extracting DNA from strawberries. They wanted to take it a step further and see what it looked like. Instructor Marcia Harmon explained to them that they couldn’t actually see the genes on the DNA, just globs of DNA. They were very excited to say the least.
Pre-Engineering students extract DNA from a strawberry
Pre-Engineering Students Charnel Lindsey, Carnegie; Peyton Sage, Binger; and Gabe Watkins, Binger extracting DNA from strawberries. They wanted to take it a step further and see what it looked like. Instructor Marcia Harmon explained to them that they couldn’t actually see the genes on the DNA, just globs of DNA. They were very excited to say the least.
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